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Wealth would create more Wealth

Q: Since Ben Graham isn’t around anymore, what money managers do you respect today? Is there a Ben Graham today?

Wealth would create more Wealth

You don’t need another Ben Graham. You don’t need another Moses. There were only Ten Commandments; we’re still waiting for the eleventh (j/k). His investing philosophy is still alive and well. There are disciples of him around, but all we are doing is parroting. I did read Phil Fisher later on, which showed the more qualitative aspects of businesses. Common stocks are part of a business. Markets are there to serve you, not to instruct you. You can often find a couple of companies that are out of line. Find one; get rich. Most people think that what the stock does from day to day contains information, but it doesn’t. It isn’t just something that wiggles around. The stock market is the best game in the world. You can take advantage of people who have no morals. High prices inside of a year will typically be 100% of the low price. Businesses don’t change in value that much. That is simply crazy. There are extreme degrees of fluctuation, and Mr. Market will call out the prices. Wait until he is nutty in one direction or the other. Put in a margin of safety. Don’t find a bridge that says no more than 10,000 pounds when you have a 9800 pound vehicle. It isn’t a function of IQ, but receptivity of the mind. When investing you don’t have to invest in all 10,000 companies available, you just have to find the one that is out of line. Mr. Market is your servant. Mr. Market is your partner and wants to sell the business to you everyday. Some days he is very optimistic and wants a high price, others he is pessimistic and will sell at a low price. You have to use this to your advantage. The market is the greatest game in the world. There is nothing else that can, at times, get this far out of line with reality. For example, land usually only fluctuates within a 15% band. Negotiated transactions are less volatile. Some get this; others don’t. Just keep your wits about you and you can make a lot of money in the market.

Best book prior to Graham was written by Edgar Lawrence Smith in 1924 called Common Stocks as Long Term Investments. It was a study that evaluated how bonds compared to stocks in various decades of the past. There weren’t a whole lot of publicly traded companies back then. He thought he knew what he was going to find. He thought that he’d find that bonds outperformed stocks during periods of deflation, and stocks outperformed during inflationary times. But what he found was that stocks outperformed the bonds in nearly all cases. John M. Keynes then enumerated the reasons that this was so. He said that over time you have more capital working for you, and thus dividends would grow higher. This was novel information back then and investors then went crazy and started buying stocks for these higher returns. But then they started to get crazy, and no longer really applied the sound tactics that made the reasons given in the book true. Be careful that when you buy something for a sound reason, make sure that the reason stays sound.

Ben Graham: “You can get in more trouble with a sound premise than an unsound premise because you’ll just throw out the unsound premise”.

Don’t worry about mistakes. You’ll make mistakes. Get over it. At the same time, it’s important to learn from someone else’s mistakes. You don’t want to make too many mistakes.

“Warren once asked Bill Gates, “If you could only hire from one place, where would it be?” Gate’s reply was Indian Institute of Technology”.

Identifying bubbles is fairly easy. You don’t know how big they will get and you don’t know when they will pop. You don’t know when midnight will hit, but when it does, it turns carriages to pumpkins and mice. What markets will do is pretty easy. When they will do it is more difficult. Some people want to stick around for the last dance, and they thought that a bigger fool would be just around the corner tomorrow.

Q: Are investors more or less knowledgeable today compared to ten years ago?

There is no doubt that there are far more “investment professionals” and way more IQ in the field, as it didn’t use to look that promising. Investment data are available more conveniently and faster today. But the behavior of investors will not be more intelligent than in the past, despite all this. How people react will not change � their psychological makeup stays constant. You need to divorce your mind from the crowd. The herd mentality causes all these IQ’s to become paralyzed. I don’t think investors are now acting more intelligently, despite the intelligence. Smart doesn’t always equal rational. To be a successful investor you must divorce yourself from the fears and greed of the people around you, although it is almost impossible.

Do you think Ponzi was crazy? The tech and telecom madness that existed just 6 years ago is right up there with the craziest mania’s that have ever happened. Huge training in capital management didn’t help.

Q: What sectors are hurting? Is there a bear market coming?

Humans are still made up of the same psychological makeup, and opportunities will always present themselves. All these people have not gotten more rational. They are moved by fear and greed. But I’m never afraid of what I am doing. What are directors thinking [by not repurchasing shares] if the business is selling on a per share basis for one-fourth of what the whole business would sell for? They don’t always think rational. I simply don’t have that problem.

 

An investor should act as though he had a lifetime decision card with just twenty punches on it.

                                                                Warren Buffett 

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