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The Five Books You Must Read If You Want To Understand Oil

Oil sinks.

Here is some light reading on light crude with a tilt to history, science, and talking your way out of a business meeting on various and sundry hydrocarbons. Read 1,000 pages, and you too can catch the commodity knife in the dark.

Five books to help you understand Oil

The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money & Power by Daniel Yergin

Deemed “the best history of oil ever written” by Business Week and with more than 300,000 copies in print, Daniel Yergin’s Pulitzer Prize–winning account of the global pursuit of oil, money, and power has been extensively updated to address the current energy crisis.

The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World

The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World by Daniel Yergin

In The Quest, master storyteller, leading energy expert and Pulitzer prize-winner for The Prize, Daniel Yergin shows us how energy is the ultimate engine of global political and economic change, in a gripping story that spans the old energies on which our civilization has been built, the new energies that are competing to replace them, and the battle over climate change. Epic in scope and never more timely, The Quest vividly reveals the decisions, technologies, and individuals that are shaping our future.

Abu Dhabi: Oil and Beyond (Power and Politics in the Gulf)

Abu Dhabi: Oil and Beyond (Power and Politics in the Gulf) by Christopher Davidson

Abu Dhabi is a new economic superpower that will soon wield enormous influence across both developing and developed worlds. The principal emirate of the United Arab Emirates federation commands over 8 percent of global oil reserves, has nearly $1 trillion in sovereign wealth funds to invest and is busily implementing a thoughtful economic master plan.

Oil & Gas Production in Nontechnical Language

Oil & Gas Production in Nontechnical Language by Martin S. Raymond

This nontechnical treatment is a great introduction to oil and gas production for anyone from beginning petroleum engineering and geology students to accountants, salespersons, and other professionals interested in the industry. Co-authored by Martin Raymond, a veteran production manager, and William Leffler, one of the top petroleum nontechnical writers, it is an easy-to-read reference for those who deal with petroleum industry personnel and production issues in their jobs, but need a quick overview of the technical and business issues. Complete with helpful charts and diagrams, this book covers everything from production equipment and processes to theory, business operations, and strategies.

The History of the Standard Oil Company

The History of the Standard Oil Company: Briefer Version by Ida M. Tarbell

Muckrakers — a term coined in 1906 by President Theodore Roosevelt — referred to American journalists, novelists and critics who, in the early 20th century, attempted to expose corruption in politics and the abuses of big business. One publication spearheading these exposés was McClures Magazine, and Ida Tarbell was the writer whose dramatic revelations eventually lead to effective regulation of the Standard Oil Company. Her story, serialized by McClure’s in 1902 and 1903, tells the history of John D. Rockefeller’s company. The first major industrial monopoly in the U.S., Standard Oil, in 1901, was the largest corporation in the country, and at its peak, controlled as much as eighty-five percent of oil refining in America. But with all his wealth and power, Rockfeller could not protect himself from Tarbell. Her story of the company, which became a model for militant journalists in the future, managed to place the blame for increasingly commercialized American ideals and practical behavior at Rockefeller’s doorstep. Combining descriptions of his business practices with his personal characteristics and even his physical appearance, Tarbell created an image of a cunning and ruthless person — a picture that not even decades of Rockefeller philanthropy were able to dispel. This edition (the “briefer version” of her book; the original was more than 800 pages.) makes a great muckraking classic much more accessible to readers. As such, it will be invaluable to students and teachers of American economic history and a fascinating read for anyone interested in the muckraking era and the days of unregulated big business.

See full article here via Bloomberg.

 

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